[Cooking] Fried Rice

By Michelle Chiang

Fried rice is a versatile dish. The key is to use adequate amount of oil and high heat. The rice grains should be separated but not dry. No wok is necessary. Use a large flat bottom shallow frying pan. The idea is to maximize air flow into the fried rice.  

Bacon Fried Rice

Ingredients:
Steamed rice – 1 cup per serving
Eggs – 1 per serving
Green Onions – thinly sliced
Bacon – 2 – 3 strips per serving; cut to small pieces
Soy Sauce – ½ teaspoon per serving
Water
Oil if needed

Steps:
Cook bacon in pan with medium heat
When bacon is cooked, but not crispy, scramble eggs in bacon fat
Add rice to pan, turn heat to high, add oil if necessary
Continue to stir-fry rice with bacon and eggs to incorporate air flow until rice grains are all separated
Don’t force rice to separate. Broken rice will stick to pan.
Add soy sauce to taste, make sure soy sauce hits the hot pan and quickly mix with all ingredients
Add green onions to pan, continue to stir-fry.
(Add additional vegetables such as peas and diced carrots if desired)
Add splash of water and stir to distribute moisture into fried rice.
Serve immediately

Options

  1. Prepare cooked protein (bacon, ham, chicken, or shrimp) and eggs separately and add to fried rice at the end of stir-frying
  2. Add finely chopped lettuce at the end instead of splash of water
  3. Peas, diced carrots, and other vegetables can be added
  4. Fried chopped garlic can be added; be careful not to burn garlic

Using Eggs

  1. Scramble eggs: add scrambled eggs to rice in pan
  2. Coating with egg yolks: mix cooled steam rice with egg yolks. This helps the rice to not stick to pan
  3. Add beaten eggs to fried rice before adding vegetables

 

Michelle Chiang is a professional designer and home cook living in Los Angeles, California, USA.

 

[Cooking] More Recipes from Michelle Chiang

Here are more recipes of Michelle Chiang’s Aisan Style Home Cooking posted in 2016 on her blog.

Beef Porridge

Braised Beef with Daikon Radish & Carrots 

Chili Dressing 

Chili Oil / Sauce

Chili Salad Dressing

Chilled Bean Sprouts Salad 

Cucumber Salad

Shrimp with Clear Noodles

Summer Fruit Bowl

Michelle Chiang is a professional designer and home cook living in Los Angeles, California, USA.

[Cooking] Sauteed Vegetables

By Michelle Chiang

Sauteed vegetables are simple and quick.

Leafy vegetables require little time to cook: cabbage, napa cabbage, baby bok choy, bean sprouts, kale, and spinach.

Vegetables that need more time to cook: green beans, carrots, zucchini, broccoli, cauliflower, and asparagus. When cooking these vegetables, ‘water-fry’ first will reduce the cooking time in heated oil.

The key is to use adequate amount of oil and salt. Keep the time of oil being heated as short as possible. Vegetable oil or animal fat is recommended.

Sauteed Leafy Vegetable

Ingredients:
Leafy vegetable – cleaned and cut to proper size
Oil
Salt
(Chopped garlic is optional.)

Steps:
Heat up pan, add oil
(Add chopped garlic and sauteed for few second until fragrant)
Add vegetable to pan, sauteed till soften
Add salt to taste, incorporate into vegetable
Serve immediately

Sauteed Vegetable with “Water-Fry”

Ingredients:
Vegetable – cleaned and cut to proper size
Water
Oil
Salt
(Chopped garlic is optional.)

Steps:
Heat up pan, add small amount of water, enough to cook vegetables half-way through.
Add vegetable to pan, sauteed till water evaporated.
Add oil to pan, sauteed till vegetable is done.
(Add chopped garlic and sauteed for few second until fragrant)
Add salt to taste
Serve immediately

Mushrooms with Butter and Soy Sauce

Ingredients:
Mushrooms – cut in half (quarter if mushrooms are large)
Butter
Soy Sauce
(Parsley flakes are optional)

Steps:
Pan fry Mushroom and butter till mushrooms are slightly brown on the edges.
Add soy sauce to taste, soy sauce must hit the hot pan for enhanced flavor.
(Sprinkle parsley flakes on top.)

 

Michelle Chiang is a professional designer and home cook living in Los Angeles, California, USA.

 

[Cooking] Make Ahead Marinated Vegetables

Marinated vegetables are a great way to enhance any meal. They last up to 5 days.

Vegetables to use: cucumber, cabbage, napa cabbage, blanched bean sprouts, or re-hydrated kelp.

Salt is main ingredient to draw out moisture and preserve the raw ingredients. Add salt to julienne or sliced vegetable and let it sit in refrigerator for at least an hour to overnight. Squeeze out the water and it is ready to be enjoyed. If it is too salty, rinse with water.

Seasoning:

  1. Combine equal parts of sugar and sushi vinegar or sushi vinegar.
  2. Add minced garlic or ginger.
  3. Both 1 & 2
  4. Add minced garlic, chili pepper, and sesame oil.

 

Kelp Salad

Ingredients:

Kelp – from making dashi
Carrots – julienne
Garlic – 1 clove, minced
Scallion – 1 stem, thinly sliced diagonally
Soy sauce – 1 tablespoon
Sugar – 1 teaspoon
Sushi vinegar – 1 teaspoon

Steps:

Cut kelp into thin strips
Combine soy sauce, sugar, and sushi vinegar in small bowl and adjust to taste
Combine kelp, carrots, garlic, and scallion in bowl, dress with seasoning
Refrigerate for minimum 1 hour before serving, can keep for 2-3 days

 

Bean Sprouts Salad

Ingredients:

Soybean sprouts
Garlic – 1 clove, minced
Scallion – 1 stem, thinly sliced diagonally
Jalapeno – half; seeds removed, thinly sliced
Salt  
Sugar
Rice wine
Sesame oil

Steps:

Blench soybean sprouts, let cool
Combine soybean sprouts, jalapeno, garlic, and scallion in bowl
Season with salt, sugar, rice wine, and sesame oil to taste
Refrigerate for minimum 1 hour before serving, can keep for 2-3 days

 

Cucumber Salad

Ingredients:

Persian Cucumbers
Sugar – approx. 1/6 of cucumber
Salt
Rice Vinegar – same amount as sugar
Ginger – thinly sliced

Steps:

Smash cucumbers, cut into small pieces, and place in a mixing bowl
Add sugar to cucumber, mix well until sugar dissolves
Add salt to taste, mix
Add vinegar, mix
Add ginger
Refrigerate and serve the next day, garnish with sesame oil (optional)

 

Michelle Chiang is a professional designer and home cook living in Los Angeles, California, USA.

 

[Tea] Dos and Don’ts of Tea Enjoyment

Dos:

Do enjoy tea with small bites.
Pairing tea with sweet or savory small bites can enhance the experience and prevents damage to the stomach lining.
Black tea – food contains butter, cheese, milk, cream, and/or egg.
Oolong tea – sweet or savory food that is not heavy with dairy.
Green tea – food that is not greasy and is light in flavor.

Do brew tea with the right temperatures.
Oolong tea – boiling water (212 F)
Black tea – short of boiling (200 F)
Green tea – very hot (190 F)

Do take time to enjoy tea.

Do enjoy a variety of teas.
Different teas have different nutrients.

Do share with loved ones.

 

Don’ts:

Don’t drink tea on an empty stomach.

Don’t leave tea liquid soaking in tea leaves overnight (or for a long period of time).

Don’t overdrink.

Drinking tea does have many benefits, but it should be enjoyed in moderation.

Don’t be too concerned about ‘the right way’.

Different cultures have unique traditions relating to tea drinking.

 

[Cooking] Make Ahead Broths

by Michelle Chiang

Various types of soups and dishes can be made if broths are available. Common broths are Japanese dashi and bone broths.

Dashi

Ingredients:
Water – 3 quarts
Dried kelp – 2-5”x8” (approx.) pieces
Dried bonito flakes – 1 cup

Steps:
Soak dried kelp in room temperature water for 1 – 2 hours (overnight OK)
Heat up water, remove kelp before boiling
Boil for 30 seconds, add bonito flakes, simmer for 10 seconds, turn off heat
Strain the soup when cooled

Uses:
Miso Soup
Udon Noodle Soup
Daikon Stew
Japanese Style Omelette
Tempura Sauce

Bone Broth

Ingredients:
Water
Bones – chicken, pork, or beef bones
     – Use ‘leftover’ bones from steak or rotisserie chicken. When using raw bones, either cook them in pan with oil or roast in oven with oil drizzled on top.
    – Place raw bones in pot with cold water, bring to boil, rinse bones thoroughly.  
Vegetables – optional
     – Save vegetable scraps such as asparagus stems, daikon radish heads, onion stems, etc. in freezer.

Steps:
Prepared bone and water in pot.
High heat and bring to boil, skim off debris.
Turn down heat to low, add vegetable if desired.
Simmer for 2 – 3 hours.

Michelle Chiang is a professional designer living in Los Angeles, California, USA.

[Cooking] An Asian Style Meal

by Michelle Chiang

An Asian style meal usually consist of rice, soup, hot dishes, and maybe cold pickled vegetables. Cold pickle dishes are made ahead and can be served for multiple meals. It takes some planning effort to ensure all dishes are served at the right temperature at the same time.

Kelp Salad
Bean Sprouts Salad
Miso Soup with Tofu
Shanghai Style Veggie Rice
Pan Fried Tofu with Ginger & Scallion
Japanese Omelette (No Recipe)

*all measurements are approximate; adjust to taste

Kelp Salad

Ingredients:
Kelp – from making dashi
Carrots – julienne
Garlic – 1 clove, minced
Scallion – 1 stem, thinly sliced diagonally
Soy sauce – 1 tablespoon
Sugar – 1 teaspoon
Sushi vinegar – 1 teaspoon

Steps:
Cut kelp into thin strips
Combine soy sauce, sugar, and sushi vinegar in small bowl and adjust to taste
Combine kelp, carrots, garlic, and scallion in bowl, dress with seasoning
Refrigerate for minimum 1 hour before serving, can keep for 2-3 days

Bean Sprouts Salad

Ingredients:
Soybean sprouts
Garlic – 1 clove, minced
Scallion – 1 stem, thinly sliced diagonally
Jalapeno – half; seeds removed, thinly sliced
Salt  
Sugar
Rice wine
Sesame oil

Steps:
Blench soybean sprouts, let cool
Combine soybean sprouts, jalapeno, garlic, and scallion in bowl
Season with salt, sugar, rice wine, and sesame oil to taste
Refrigerate for minimum 1 hour before serving, can keep for 2-3 days

Miso Soup with Tofu

Ingredients:
Dashi – 3 cups
Soft tofu – cut to small cubes
White miso – 3 teaspoons
Scallion – green part thinly sliced for garnish
Salt  
Soy sauce
Steps:
Bring dashi to boil, add tofu
Turn off heat, work miso through mesh into soup
Season with salt and soy sauce to taste
Garnish with scallion

Shanghai Style Veggie Rice

Ingredients:
Cooked rice – 1-½ cup
Oil – 1 tablespoon
Shallot – half, thinly sliced
Baby bok choy – 2, finely chopped
Salt

Steps:
Fry shallot in oil on medium heat. Tilt the pan to gather oil for easier frying
When shallot turns golden, add baby bok choy, turn up heat
When baby bok choy is done, turn off heat, season with salt, add rice and mix well

Pan Fried Tofu with Ginger & Scallion

Ingredients:
Oil – 2 tablespoons
Medium/firm tofu – half package, cut to approx. 1½”x1½”x3/8” pieces
Ginger – julienne
Scallion – thinly sliced diagonally
Soy sauce
Salt

Steps:
Oil in pan, fry tofu until golden on both sides, remove from pan, sprinkle with salt
Add ginger and scallion to pan, sauteed for a few seconds, add soy sauce
Pour sauce over fried tofu and serve

 

Michelle Chiang is a professional designer living in Los Angeles, California, USA.

Le Vert thé

Tea Brochure

Price List


Loose Leaf Tea
In-Stock
Sun-Moon Lake Black Tea 日月潭紅茶(水沙蓮)            50g     $19.00
Ali Shan Jinxuan Tea 阿里山金萱茶                               100g     $17.00
Ali Shan High-Mountain Oolong Tea 阿里山高山茶   100g     $15.00
San-Xia Spiral Jade Green Tea 三峽碧螺春綠茶            50g     $14.00

Limited Availability
Premium Oriental Beauty 頂級東方美人(季節限量)     50g     $65.00
Finest Oriental Beauty 特選東方美人(白毫烏龍)           50g     $37.00
Da-Yu-Ling High Mountain Tea 大禹嶺高山茶           100g     $67.00
Lee-San Oolong Tea 梨山高山茶                                     100g     $47.00
Ali Shan Pearl Dew Oolong 阿里山珠露茶                    100g     $34.00
Dong-Ding Oolong Tea 鹿谷凍頂烏龍茶                       100g     $28.00
Lee-San Organic Oolong Tea 梨山有機高山茶             100g     $47.00
Lee-San Honey Oolong Tea 梨山蜜香烏龍                    100g     $47.00

Tea Bags
Black Tea Tea-Bags 日月潭紅茶茶包                              5 bags     $3.75
Green Tea Tea-Bags 三峽碧螺春茶包                             5 bags     $3.75
Oolong Tea Tea-Bags 阿里山金萱茶包                           5 bags     $3.75

CANISTERS
Large 綠茗堂茶葉密封罐﹝大﹞                                             400 ml     $5.00
Medium 綠茗堂茶葉密封罐﹝中﹞                                        200 ml     $4.00
Small 綠茗堂茶葉密封罐﹝小﹞                                               30 ml     $3.00

GIFT BOXES
Red 綠茗堂禮盒﹝紅﹞                                                                             $9.00
Brown 綠茗堂禮盒﹝咖啡﹞                                                                    $9.00

Tea Brewing Method


Oriental Beauty, Green Tea, and Black Tea (long-shaped tea leaves):

3g of tea leaves, 150 ml of water. Brew for 3-5 minutes in 85-95°C (175 – 195°F) water.

OB or Black

Oolong (ball-shaped tea leaves):

3g of tea leaves, 150 ml of water. Brew for 3-5 minutes in 100-95°C (212 – 195°F) water.

Oolong

Cold Brewing

Using the basis of the leaf-to-water ratio for non-strained tea, brew any type of tea leaf with cold water, let it sit at room temperature for about half an hour, and place in the refrigerator for 6 hours or more before consuming.

Tea Regions in Taiwan


1

The quality and taste of tea is determined by the soil and climate. From the beginning, Taiwan’s unique natural environment has enabled it to produce oolong tea of the highest quality. In terms of soil, most of the soil composition in the alpine region of Taiwan’s central mountains range (1000m and above) is sandy clay suitable for the growth of well-irrigated top grade tea plants growing in hilly regions. In terms of weather, the marked temperature difference between day and night time in the mountains, as well as the fog at night and dawn, improve the quality of the tea plants.

Due to the different altitude and soil of each region, each kind of high-mountain tea is marked by a unique taste and fragrance. The most popular tea plantation regions in Taiwan are currently Lee-San, Ali Shan, Dong-Ding Shan, and Da-Yu-Ling Shan.

We love Taiwan and value the land’s future. This is why all teas in Le Vert thé’s collections meet SGS pesticide inspection standards. Over-elaborate packaging is not necessary to emphasize the quality of our tea leaves. We use vacuum foil packaging to ensure the quality of tea leaves. Packaged in small sizes, you  will be able to finish tea leaves soon after opening up the package and always enjoy the freshest tea.

This is the reason why Le Vert thé’s (Come Buy Tea) original and strongest conviction is to sell premium Taiwanese teas while also introducing others to the true beauty of Taiwan.

Core Collection


San-Xia Spiral Jade Green Tea 三峽碧螺春綠茶

Strain: Qinxing Ganzi

Fermentation: not fermented

Taste: clean fragrance; bright and crisp

Tea liquor: clear green, easy to drink

Ali Shan Jinxuan Tea 阿里山金萱茶

Strain: Taiwan tea No. 12 (alpine jinxuan)

Fermentation: light-medium fermentation

Taste: smooth with a natural milky aroma

Tea liquor: golden with a honey green color

Ali Shan High-Mountain Oolong Tea 阿里山高山茶

Strain: Qinxing oolong

Fermentation: light-medium fermentation

Taste: smooth with a flowery aroma and refreshing aftertaste

Tea liquor: golden with a honey green color

Sun Moon Lake Black Tea 日月潭紅茶(水沙蓮)

Strain: Assam

Fermentation: full natural fermentation

Taste: smooth fragrance, full-bodied taste with a hint of caramel

Tea liquor: clear, bright red

 

 

Taiwan: Introducing Oolong (Wulong) (Wu Long) Tea

boardingpassadventures

A Guide to Taiwanese Oolong :
by DANIELLE HAWKINS
After having spent many years living in Taiwan, you grow to learn a lot about one of the most prized teas of the country. Oolong. Not as critically acclaimed abroad, this tea is by far one of the most celebrated teas in Taiwan. The best place to put Oolong is somewhere between Green Tea (minimally altered leaves) and Black Tea (barely resembling a leaf).

Oolong tea is one of the most intricate and complex teas to manufacture. Unlike a green tea, which undergoes zero oxidation and black tea, which is oxidized at one hundred percent. Oolong tea falls somewhere in the middle and lies anywhere within a range of twelve to eighty percent oxidization, making the process both challenging and labour intensive. Production times of Oolong can last as long as forty hours post harvest, where elaborate methods of withering, rolling…

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